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Newsweek Learning English: teksty po angielsku w Newsweeku – Learning english




Nora Dance Drama


Thailand

Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions


Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions

Fot.: UNESCO


A form of dance more than 500 years old, Nora is steeped in acrobatic movements and fast music. Nora performers tell stories of the Buddha, along with local legends of cultural importance. The costuming is incredibly ornate, complete with brightly colored headdresses; long, curling fake nails; and beaded wares.


NEWSWEEK PODCASTS A „Complicated and Beautiful Region”



Ceebu Jën Culinary Art


Senegal

Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions


Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions

Fot.: UNESCO


Ceebu jën is a fish-and-vegetable dish mothers pass down to their daughters in Senegal’s fishing villages. Along with the recipe, cultural practices accompany the meal; for example, diners must hold the bowls in their left hands, and no grains of rice can fall to the ground. The ingredients hold significance as well; cooks choose them based on the importance of the event—or how much they like their guests.



Corpus Christi Festival


Panama

Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions


Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions

Fot.: UNESCO


Burlesque dancers, theater troupes, drag queens and priests come together to put on this fete, a combination of Catholic traditions, local cultural customs and folklore. Costumed and masked participants dance in the streets, visiting one another’s homes for food and drinks. Children participate, too, by making their own masks and taking dance classes.



Awajún People’s Pottery Practices


Peru

Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions


Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions

Fot.: UNESCO


For the last thousand years, pottery has been a way for the Awajún people to connect with nature through intricate designs that mimic natural patterns, and for women specifically to express themselves through art. Women elders, the Dukúg wisewomen, teach their skills to the younger generations, while instilling the culture’s values.



Truffle Hunting


Italy

Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions


Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions

Fot.: UNESCO


Truffle hunters have been a part of Italy’s rural communities for hundreds of years, known for their unique skill set and knowledge of the natural world, passed down through oral tradition and fables. Locating truffles is a difficult feat in itself (specialized dogs help with the job), but safely removing the fungus from the soil is a different challenge altogether, requiring deep knowledge of climate and soil conditions to preserve the mushroom’s environment.



Tbourida Equestrian Performance


Morocco


Riders and their steeds re-enact the techniques once used by ancient warriors in this equestrian tradition preserved for centuries through oral tradition. While riders dress in the historic fashion, their horses get glammed up too, donning hand-embroidered bridles and saddles with traditional designs.



Carolinian Wayfinding and Canoe Making


Micronesia

Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions


Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions

Fot.: UNESCO


These wayfinders’ canoes are built by community members with local timber. They are able to withstand long distances across the sea and are navigated using signals from the environment only. Throughout history, the wayfarers helped their communities settle in the islands throughout the Pacific. But today, their practices are dwindling—in part, due to climate migration and environmental destruction. UNESCO has classified this item as “in Need of Urgent Safeguarding.”



Bakhshi Performance Art


Uzbekistan

Tried-and-True Remedies from Around the World


Tried-and-True Remedies from Around the World

Fot.: Getty Images, istock


Beloved by children and adults alike, this is an art form in which skilled orators tell ancient epic poems of local folktales and myths, with themes like love, friendship and community. The stories—accompanied by instruments—are performed by heart despite their length.



Hüsn-i Hat Calligraphy


Turkey

Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions


Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions

Fot.: UNESCO


Turkish calligraphers, or hattats, write using ancient methods and tools to create letters in the traditional aesthetic as a visual art as well as a way to transmit ideas. Hattats pass down the skills to young apprentices, who continue the cycle. Hüsn-i Hat is used today in texts of faith, mosque art and at Turkish baths.



Durga Puja Hindu Festival


India

Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions


Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions

Fot.: UNESCO


This 10-day festival celebrates the Hindu goddess Durga, known as the protective mother of the universe. In the months leading up to it, people collect clay from the Ganges River to sculpt the goddess. On the first day, they paint on her eyes and the celebration commences. Local artisans create exhibits and Bengali drummers perform traditional beats. On the last day, Durga’s sculptures are submerged in the river, symbolizing her return home.



Namur Stilt Jousting


Belgium

Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions


Intangible Cultural Heritage Traditions

Fot.: UNESCO


A tradition with roots in the early 1400s, stilt jousting remains an important cultural totem in the city of Namur today. Players compete on teams to try and knock each other to the ground—all while dressed in costume and wobbling around with extra wooden legs. While historically practiced only by men, the official stilt jousting association opened programming to women in 2018.



[SŁOWNICZEK]


intangible – niematerialny


Micronesian wayfarers – mikronezyjscy wędrowcy


steeped in something – zanurzony w czymś


ornate – ozdobny


pass down – przekazać coś komuś dalej


hold significance – mieć znaczenie


put on a fete – wystawić sztukę, przygotować festyn


intricate designs – misterne wzory


instill the culture’s values – wpajać wartości kulturowe


fable – bajka, przypowieść


fungus – grzyb


steed – wierzchowiec


equestrian tradition – tradycje jeździeckie


glam up – dekorować, zdobić


don hand-embroidered bridles and saddles – przywdziewać ręcznie haftowane uzdy i siodła


withstand – wytrzymywać, być odpornym



Task 1


Read the text and answer the following questions: Where can you enjoy…


1. … a show performed by a troupe of riders and horses wearing period costumes?


2. … the celebration of a goddess?


3. … discovering the centuries-old tradition of building and navigating long-distance canoes?


4. … seeing women making pottery to connect with nature?


5. … watching a lively and acrobatic form of dance theatre?


6. … listening to epic poems accompanied by music?



Task 2


First, match the words to form collocations and verb phrases that will help you describe the issue presented in the article. Next, write down a sentence using each collocation and verb phrase. The sentences you create should relate to the topic being discussed in the text. (See Key)


Collocations:


cultural


pottery


natural


burlesque


theater


local


troupes


diversity


dancers


artisans


tradition


patterns


Verb phrases:


inherit


connect


express


instill


hold


pass down


the culture’s values


the skills


with nature


significance


from ancestors


oneself through art



Task 3


Use the collocations and verb phrases above to sum up the key points of the text. Record your text analysis on a voice recorder, or practice delivering your presentation in a group setting.


Examples:


Each year, UNESCO compiles …


The chosen items are …


The list serves to recognize …


From the navigation skills of …



Task 4


Now it’s time to put forward your views on the issues. Write an article on the topic: Poland’s intangible cultural heritage.


Points to consider


∗ Decide on the style of the article (formal, neutral, informal)


∗ Think of a short, clear, appropriate headline to attract the reader’s attention


∗ Deal with a different aspect of the topic in each paragraph


∗ Use linking words/transitions to connect your ideas (while, however, moreover)


∗ Avoid using simplistic words (good, bad, nice etc.)



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